No Snow, But Some White Rabbits.

Dear Reader,

It has been a month. I have not forgotten you. I have, in the interim, accepted a new job, subbed five Chinese classes every day for three weeks, and driven all over the place to get from one gig to the other. Now that the dust of November has settled, let’s get back to the pressing matter of Chinese candy.

White Rabbit

A package of White Rabbit milk candies.

Eventually, I would love to feature “real food” at Chinese Checkout, but White Rabbit milk candy takes precedence. Like haw flakes, White Rabbits are the stuff of childhood. There are lots of milk candies in Asian supermarkets, but when it comes to White Rabbits, accept no substitutions. Since 1959, The Shanghai confectioner Guanshengyuan had been rolling out these creamy, chewy, Tootsie Rolly (/toffee-like) candies. According to an anonymous source quoted all over the Chinese Internet, the trademark leaping rabbit “symbolically jumps deep into the heart of the people.”1 Of course, there’s an uncuddly part of this story, too. Remember all that melamine found in Chinese dairy products a few years back? Yeah, White Rabbits were tainted, too. Not anymore, though! And I’m happy to report that I have eaten lots of these over the years, and have had no side effects as of yet.

White Rabbit, Unwrapped

White Rabbit, unwrapped.

Like some other Asian candies,  White Rabbits are wrapped in rice paper to keep them from sticking to the outer wrapper. Don’t try to peel it off. The rice paper will melt on your tongue. If you’re still unsure what to do with these, or even where to get them, look in your front yard for a giant talking rabbit with a five o’ clock shadow. He’ll show you how it’s done.

1. Just Google this phrase: 商標是一隻跳躍狀的白兔,形象深入民心.

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